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SFAQ Pick: “Hood Pass,” solo exhibition by Stephen McClintock at Louis B. James, New York.

Stephen McClintock

“Hood Pass”

Louis B. James

143B Orchard Street, New York, NY 10002

Reception: July 31, 6-8pm

July 31 – August 28, 2014

 

 

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Thursday, July 31, Louis B. James hosts a reception for “Hood Pass,” a new exhibition of photography and video by Stephen McClintock. McClintock works with a range of cameras and film, capturing contemporary subjects with a refreshingly traditional focus on the technicality and authenticity of an original image. Imagery ranges from biographic views of New York City and reflections on Camden County, New Jersey, where McClintock grew up, to more explorative photographic projects like his “Food Series,” in which the artist appropriates and composes elements of commercial photography.

 

The opening reception takes place July 31, from 6 – 8 pm.

 
 

Stephen McClintock, "Food Series #1," 35 MM C-prints, 20 x 28", edition of 3, 2014

Stephen McClintock, “Food Series #1,” 35mm C-prints, 20 x 28″, edition of 3, 2014

 

The exhibition remains on view through August 28.

For more information, please visit the gallery’s website.

 

Recent SFAQ Picks:

-SFAQ Pick: “MATRIX 254,” solo exhibition by Geta Bratescu at BAM/PFA, Berkeley.

-SFAQ PICK: “Superobjects: Subversive Souvenirs,” lecture by John de Fazio at SFAI, San Francisco.

-SFAQ Pick: “The White Album,” group exhibition at Richard Telles Fine Art, Los Angeles.

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SFAQ Pick: “MATRIX 254,” solo exhibition by Geta Bratescu at BAM/PFA, Berkeley.

Geta Bratescu

“MATRIX 254”

UC Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

2626 Bancroft Way, Berkeley, CA 94720

Curator Walkthrough: July 27, 1 pm

July 25 – September 28, 2014

 

 

Sunday, July 27, curator Aspara DiQuinzio leads a walkthrough of the newly opened exhibition by Geta Bratescu at the Berkeley Art Museum. DiQuinzio, curator of modern and contemporary art, provides insight into the life and work of a prolific artist largely unknown to international audiences until quite recently. Bratescu (b. 1926) has been living and working in Bucharest since the 1950s in a dynamic combination of media, including but not limited to drawing, collage, photography, video, performance, and printmaking. MATRIX 254, Bratescu’s first solo U.S. museum presentation, includes a selection of works made between 1977 and 2000, including “The Studio,” an early film.

 

The curator walkthrough begins on July 27 at 1 pm.

 

"Towards White," 9 b/w photographs, mounted on paper, 1976-2011. Courtesy the artist and Galerie Barbara Weiss, Berlin.

“Towards White,” 9 black and white photographs, mounted on paper, 1976-2011. Courtesy of the artist and Galerie Barbara Weiss.

 

"Atelier Continuu," installation view, Galerie Barbara Weiss, Berlin, 2014. Courtesy of Galerie Barbara Weiss.

“Atelier Continuu,” installation view, Galerie Barbara Weiss, Berlin, 2014. Courtesy of the artist of Galerie Barbara Weiss.

 

The exhibition remains on view through September 28.

For more information please visit the museum’s website.

 

Recent SFAQ Picks:

-SFAQ PICK: “Superobjects: Subversive Souvenirs,” lecture by John de Fazio at SFAI, San Francisco.

-SFAQ Pick: “The White Album,” group exhibition at Richard Telles Fine Art, Los Angeles.

-SFAQ Pick: “Letters to Chantri #1: The lady at the door/The gift that keeps on giving,” solo exhibition by Korakrit Arunanondchai at The Mistake Room, Los Angeles.

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SFAQ PICK: “Superobjects: Subversive Souvenirs,” lecture by John de Fazio at SFAI, San Francisco.

John de Fazio

“Superobjects: Subversive Souvenirs”

San Francisco Art Institute

800 Chestnut St, San Francisco, CA 94133

July 25, 6:30 pm

 

This Friday, July 25, the San Francisco Art Institute welcomes artists John de Fazio as a guest speaker in their Graduate Lecture Series. de Fazio creates commemorative sculptures that reference and reflect upon contemporary life, depicting figures and elements of politics and mass media with both humor and sincerity. de Fazio’s sculptures take their forms from ornate historical and ceremonial objects, and their content from the present; the results are a record of our time, in the physical language of the anthropological display. Three of de Fazio’s “superobjects” were recently acquired by The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston.

 

The lecture begins at 6:30 pm. Please RSVP on the SFAI website.

 

Please note that Saturday, July 26 is also the last day of “Wrong’s What I Do Best,” the current exhibition in the SFAI Walter and McBean Galleries.

 

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For more information, please visit the SFAI website.

 

Recent SFAQ Picks:

-SFAQ Pick: “The White Album,” group exhibition at Richard Telles Fine Art, Los Angeles.

-SFAQ Pick: “Letters to Chantri #1: The lady at the door/The gift that keeps on giving,” solo exhibition by Korakrit Arunanondchai at The Mistake Room, Los Angeles.

-SFAQ Pick: “Way Out West” Launch Party at Heron Arts, San Francisco.

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SFAQ Pick: “The White Album,” group exhibition at Richard Telles Fine Art, Los Angeles.

Christopher Badger, Kristin Beinner James, Eduardo Consuegra, Alika Cooper, Dan Finsel, Mark Hagen, Daniel Ingroff, Barry Johnston, James Krone, Max Maslansky, Dianna Molzan, Laurie Nye, Fay Ray, Amanda Ross-Ho, Kathleen Ryan, Owen Schmit, Semi-Tropic Spiritualists, Mary Weatherford, Jonas Wood

“The White Album”

Richard Telles Fine Art

7380 Beverly Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90036

Reception: July 19, 5-7 pm

July 19 – August 16, 2014

 

 

The new exhibition at Richard Telles Fine Art, “The White Album,” features nineteen Los Angeles-based artists working in painting, sculpture, video, performance, and more. Curated by Gladys-Katherina Hernando, the exhibition takes its name from an essay and book by Joan Didion in which she explores various aspects of California in the 60s. Exhibiting artists address Los Angeles, and California more generally, as a place of myth, mysticism, and transformation. A publication produced in conjunction with the exhibition includes texts by Gladys-Katherina Hernando, Lia Trinka-Browner, and Itza Vilaboy.

 

The gallery hosts an opening reception Saturday, July 19 from 5 – 7 pm.

 

At 6:30 pm the night of the opening, expect a performance by the Semi-Tropic Spiritualists, the collaborative project of Astri Swendsrud and Quinn Gomez-Heitzeberg.

 

 

Daniel Ingroff, "Parrot," acrylic on canvas, 54 x 40.5 in., 2014. Courtesy of Richard Telles Fine Art.

Daniel Ingroff, “Parrot,” acrylic on canvas, 54 x 40.5 in., 2014. Courtesy of Richard Telles Fine Art.

 

The exhibition remains on view through August 16.

For more information, please visit the gallery’s website.

 

Recent SFAQ Picks:

-SFAQ Pick: “Letters to Chantri #1: The lady at the door/The gift that keeps on giving,” solo exhibition by Korakrit Arunanondchai at The Mistake Room, Los Angeles.

-SFAQ Pick: “Way Out West” Launch Party at Heron Arts, San Francisco.

-SFAQ Pick: “Go With the Flow,” group exhibition at The Hole, New York.

 

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SFAQ Pick: “Letters to Chantri #1: The lady at the door/The gift that keeps on giving,” solo exhibition by Korakrit Arunanondchai at The Mistake Room, Los Angeles.

Korakrit Arunanondchai
“Letters to Chantri #1: The lady at the door/The gift that keeps on giving”
The Mistake Room
1811 E. 20th St. LA, CA 90058
Reception: July 18, 7:30-9:30
July 18 – September 13, 2014

 

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On Friday, July 18, The Mistake Room hosts an opening reception for “Letters to Chantri #1: The lady at the door/The gift that keeps on giving” a new video installation by Korakrit Arunanondchai. The first part of a longterm project, this exhibition is one of a series in which various characters will be introduced and developed towards a future feature film. This installment is the product of an ongoing collaboration between Arunanondchai and performance artist boychild; also contributing to the project are Director of Photography Alex Gvojic, Producer Rory Mulhere, Composer Harry Bornstein, and artists Cherisse Gray and Zanzie. This will be the artist’s first solo exhibition in Los Angeles; his first solo museum presentation is on view through September 14 at MoMA PS1.

 

The Mistake Room hosts an opening reception Friday, July 18 from 7:30 – 9:30 pm.

 

 

 

Korakrit Arunanondchai, 2014. Courtesy of Visionaire Blog.

Korakrit Arunanondchai, 2014. Courtesy of Visionaire Blog.

 

The exhibition remains on view through September 13.

For more information, please visit the gallery’s website.

 

Recent SFAQ Picks:

-SFAQ Pick: “Way Out West” Launch Party at Heron Arts, San Francisco.

-SFAQ Pick: “Go With the Flow,” group exhibition at The Hole, New York.

-SFAQ Pick: “New,” solo exhibition by Yung Jake at Steve Turner Contemporary, Los Angeles.

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SFAQ Pick: “Way Out West” Launch Party at Heron Arts, San Francisco.

Brett Amory, APEX ONE, Pakayla Rae Biehn, Anthony Discenza, Double Zero (Annie Vought and Hannah Ireland), Jeremy Fish, Casey Gray, Desiree Holman, Chris Johanson, Jet Martinez, Alicia Mccarthy, Alia Penner, Andrew Schoultz, Dave Schubert, Jen Stark, Zio Ziegler, Andrew Li, John Patrick McKenzie, and Kate Thompson
“Way Out West” Launch Party
Heron Arts
7 Heron Street, San Francisco, CA 94103
July 17, 5:30 pm (Collector and Press Preview), 7pm (General Admission)

July 7 – August 17, 2014

 

 

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Thursday, July 17, The Art City Project hosts a reception at Heron Arts for “Way Out West,” a new public art exhibition. Curated by Tova Lobatz and Jenny Sharaf, the exhibition fills spaces typically occupied by advertisements with artwork, reconfiguring billboards, transit shelters, the sides of buses, and more. This public exhibition, the first for The Art City Project, responds to the rapid physical and social developments taking place in San Francisco’s inner Mission district by allowing artists to occupy high-visibility space in the transitional landscape. “Way Out West” is a timely celebration of California as a place of dreams, innovation, and change.

 

The Art City Project hosts a launch party Thursday, July 17 at Heron Arts, where the original artwork for the project will be on view, along with limited edition prints from Magnolia Editions. Complimentary refreshments will be provided by Espolon Tequila, and local DJs will perform throughout the evening.

 

For tickets and more information, please visit this link.

 

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“Way Out West,” The Art City Project, San Francisco, 2014. Foreground: Desiree Holman, “From Troglodyte to Sophont.” Background: Anthony Discenza, “Sell Your Hopes.”

 

Anthony Discenza, "Sell Your Hopes," billboard at 15th Street and South Van Ness, San Francisco, 2014.

Anthony Discenza, “Sell Your Hopes,” billboard at 15th Street and South Van Ness, San Francisco, 2014.

 

Desiree Holman, "," San Francisco

Desiree Holman, “From Troglodyte to Sophont,” billboard at 15th Street and South Van Ness, San Francisco, 2014.

 

Casey Gray, "California Love," billboard across from Zeitgeist on Duboce and Valencia, San Francisco, 2014.

Casey Gray, “California Love,” billboard across from Zeitgeist at Duboce and Valencia, San Francisco, 2014.

 

The exhibition remains on view through August 17.

For more information, please visit The Art City Project’s website.

 

Recent SFAQ Picks:

-SFAQ Pick: “Go With the Flow,” group exhibition at The Hole, New York.
-SFAQ Pick: “New,” solo exhibition by Yung Jake at Steve Turner Contemporary, Los Angeles.
-SFAQ Pick: “The History of Technology,” group exhibition at Jessica Silverman Gallery, San Francisco.

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SFAQ Pick: “Go With the Flow,” group exhibition at The Hole, New York.

Adam Henry, Austin Lee, Brian Belott, Dennis Hoekstra, Eric Cahan, Evan Gruzis, Greg Bogin, Jesse Edwards, Jessica Ciocci, JIMJOE, KATSU, Keltie Ferris, Michael Dotson, Michael Staniak, Rosson Crow, Timothy Uriah Steele, Trudy Benson, Wendy White, and Zane Lewis

“Go With the Flow”

The Hole

312 Bowery, New York, NY 10012

July 10 – August 23, 2014

 

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This summer, the Hole presents “Go With the Flow,” a group exhibition of artists working with sprayed paint. Now on view, the exhibition features artists utilizing methods of paint application once mainly confined to automotive finishing and graffiti writing. Included works demonstrate the particular and diverse visual effects possible; artists explore atomized paint as a way of achieving perfect gradations of color and light, illusions of depth, analog renderings of digital imagery, as well as the inevitable reframing of surrounding techniques and materials.

 

 

Michael Dotson, "Showered," Acrylic on Panel, 24 x 24 in., 2014 (left), and "Bath Time," Acrylic on Panel, 24 x 24 in., 2013 (right).

Michael Dotson, “Showered,” acrylic on panel, 24 x 24 in., 2014 (left) and “Bath Time,” acrylic on panel, 24 x 24 in., 2013 (right). Courtesy of The Hole.

 

Adam Henry, "Untitled (tvptgd)," synthetic polymers on linen, 67 x 51 in., 2013. Courtesy of The Hole.

Adam Henry, “Untitled (tvptgd),” synthetic polymers on linen, 67 x 51 in., 2013. Courtesy of The Hole.

 

The exhibition remains on view through August 23.

For more information, please visit the gallery’s website.

 

Recent SFAQ Picks:

-SFAQ Pick: “New,” solo exhibition by Yung Jake at Steve Turner Contemporary, Los Angeles.

-SFAQ Pick: “The History of Technology,” group exhibition at Jessica Silverman Gallery, San Francisco.

-SFAQ Pick: “Summer Highlights,” group exhibition at John Berggruen Gallery, San Francisco.

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SFAQ Pick: “New,” solo exhibition by Yung Jake at Steve Turner Contemporary, Los Angeles.

Yung Jake

“New”

Steve Turner Contemporary

6026 Wilshire Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90036

Reception: July 12, 7-9 pm

July 12 – August 23, 2014

 

 

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This Saturday, July 12, Steve Turner Contemporary hosts an opening reception for “New,” a solo exhibition by Yung Jake. The Los Angeles-based artist, born on the Internet in 2011, presents a variety of found objects treated to an application of popular, Internet-specific imagery printed on vinyl. The wall-mounted works are complemented by two large metal containers with a similar hybrid aesthetic and filled with fluorescent lights. Video sharing websites, pop-up advertisements, and other visual materials typically confined to virtual experience creep onto the analog and tangible as if this step is inevitable, and seemingly it is.

 

The gallery hosts an opening reception Saturday, July 12 from 7 – 9 pm.

 

 

Yung Jake, "Old (Page 1)" & "Old (Page 2)," Printed vinyl on found metal, 46 1/2 x 19 1/2 inches each, 2014. Courtesy of Steve Turner Contemporary.

Yung Jake, “Old (Page 1)” & “Old (Page 2),” Printed vinyl on found metal, 46 1/2 x 19 1/2 in. each, 2014. Courtesy of Steve Turner Contemporary.

 

Yung Jake, "1280 x 720," Printed vinyl on found metal, fluorescent lights, 36 1/2 x 77 x 35 in, 2014. Courtesy of Steve Turner Contemporary.

Yung Jake, “1280 x 720,” Printed vinyl on found metal, fluorescent lights, 36 1/2 x 77 x 35 in., 2014. Courtesy of Steve Turner Contemporary.

 

"New," Installation view, Steve Turner Contemporary, Los Angeles, July 2014. Courtesy of Steve Turner Contemporary.

“New,” installation view, Steve Turner Contemporary, Los Angeles, July 2014. Courtesy of Steve Turner Contemporary.

The exhibition remains on view through August 23.

For more information, please visit the gallery’s website.

 

Recent SFAQ Picks:

-SFAQ Pick: “The History of Technology,” group exhibition at Jessica Silverman Gallery, San Francisco.

-SFAQ Pick: “Summer Highlights,” group exhibition at John Berggruen Gallery, San Francisco.

-SFAQ Pick: Closing reception for “Sights and Sounds of Stage and Screen,” David Bayus and Ben Bigelow at City Limits, Oakland.

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SFAQ Pick: “The History of Technology,” group exhibition at Jessica Silverman Gallery, San Francisco.

Simon Denny, Samuel Levi Jones, Dashiell Manley, Philipp Timischl, and Margo Wolowiec

“The History of Technology”

Jessica Silverman Gallery

488 Ellis Street, San Francisco, CA 94102

Reception: July 11, 6-8 pm

July 11 – August 23, 2014

 

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Friday, July 11, Jessica Silverman Gallery opens “The History of Technology,” a new group exhibition featuring work by Simon Denny, Samuel Levi Jones, Dashiell Manley, Philipp Timischl and Margo Wolowiec. The artists explore the relationship between painting and communications technologies (books, films, television, etc.), and the potential to harness the particular effects of these forms of media in artwork.

 

The gallery hosts an opening reception Friday, July 11 from 6 – 8 pm.

 

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A zine created in conjunction with the exhibition is available for online viewing here.

 

The exhibition remains on view through August 23.

For more information, please visit the gallery’s website.

 

Recent SFAQ Picks:

-SFAQ Pick: “Summer Highlights,” group exhibition at John Berggruen Gallery, San Francisco.

-SFAQ Pick: Closing reception for “Sights and Sounds of Stage and Screen,” David Bayus and Ben Bigelow at City Limits, Oakland.

-SFAQ Pick: “Paddles ON!” auction at Phillips, London.

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SUMMER VACATION #5: Weeki Wachee & Salvador Dali

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On the Fourth of July my family had a small reunion—parents, brothers, grand parents, great-grand mother, aunt, cousin, nephew—all met on Manasota Key on the west side of Florida. The drive across the Everglades from Miami was four and a half hours and I saw on the map that Weeki Wachee Springs was just a bit farther up the coast. At dinner I announced “I’m driving to Weeki Wachee, who wants to come!?!” which was met by incredulous stares all around: “Weeki Wachee? The Mermaids?” Finally my younger brother said: “You always make us go to these lame places—remember that “Doll Museum”? That was a horrible. I’m not going to some tourist trap in the middle of nowhere to see people dressed like mermaids.” And therein lies the difference between us, because “tourist-trap+middle-of-nowhere+mermaids” is exactly my idea of a good time. (The “Doll Museum” in question was an old lady’s home in Highpoint North Carolina; when she died it was turned it into a “museum”—there aren’t even that many dolls, just enough for them line the walls single file. In my brother’s defense I do have a perverse love of pitiful homemade museums because they are so human compared their corporate cousins.)

 

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Sunday I woke up at 6am to drive by myself to “the only city of live mermaids” arriving in time to catch the first show at 10am. Weeki Wachee is an exceptionally clear natural spring on the Gulf Coast of Florida. In the ’40s a theatre was built into one side of the spring—stadium seating hugging an underwater arc of windows. Aerosmith’s “Girls of Summer” starts playing as the rouched curtains crawl upward, revealing the blue view into the spring. There is a shallow sand-colored stage that extends some feet from the windows before dropping off into the open of the spring, which is the deepest in the United States. The rocky walls are covered with sea weed and small live fishes swim around. Bubbles start wiggling up from a network of tubes and three women with mermaid tails swim up.

 

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They carry long black hoses to breathe air through, floating their hair with elaborate bursts of bubble choreography. The hoses are unexpectedly beautiful, like drawings in space. In between synchronized swim numbers a thin bubble curtain silvers out the windows. For the grand finale two mermaids drink bottles of coke-a-cola underwater. I loved every single second of it and all I can think about is getting a grant to come film in it.

 

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I walk around the rest of the park photographing mermaid objects.

 

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More families flow in mostly to play at the water park on the other side of the spring. I kill time buying mermaid merch until the next show at noon, “Hans Christian Anderson’s Little Mermaid.” I go back to the underwater theatre a half hour early to get a good seat and read. The little girl next to me wearing a tiara—Peggy age nine—interrupts me.
Peggy: “Hi, what are you reading?”
Me: “A play—The Glass Menagerie.”
Peggy: “What is it about?”
Me: “A boy comes to a girl’s house for dinner. And there is a glass unicorn.”
Peggy: “Wow I want to read that! I’ll write it down”
Me: “You should.”

Just as the lights are going down:
Peggy: “Are you going to get your picture made with a mermaid?”
Me: “I have to.”
Peggy: “Yeah, who wouldn’t!”

 

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It becomes clear that the title “Hans Christian Anderson’s Little Mermaid” is more to separate it from Disney than to signal connection to the19th century story. Nevertheless it is a ’90s synthy knock-off of the Disney movie, where the prince kills the sea witch thanks to the strength of “true love”—as if. I’ve been reading essays by Thyrza Goodeve about vaudeville and narrative that are relevant to Weeki Wachee: the sight of human bodies moving underwater changes time and space so profoundly that narrative falls apart, and needs to be approached in a different way. The first show, which is essentially just turn-of-the-century vaudeville spectacle, works so beautifully.

 

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I realized that the Salvador Dali museum was on my drive home so I decided to leave and go directly there. Walking out I heard a woman tell her young daughter that she was “too old” to get her picture taken with a mermaid. On reflex I whipped my head around and said “Excuse me!”

 

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Driving down the flat Florida roads remind me of my childhood and I listen to Fleetwood Mac as they open all the way to St. Petersburg. The Dali museum is an extravagant tourist trap with narrow spiral staircase like an orange peel in the center, too small for the fat tourists waddling up it. I couldn’t see anything because it was so packed, so I stole a few minutes looking at the rough, small paintings from the ’30s before escaping. I’ve been thinking of Dali in more complex ways after reading his writing (sadly very out of print) and because Thomas B. Hess was his friend and supporter. I grabbed a cup of coffee at their Gala cafe, out of nowhere the checkout girl smiled and asked “do you know that song WILD HORSES? I love that song!”—”Me too, reminds me of FEAR with Marky Mark.”

http://youtu.be/tumI28B48wY

—Contributed by Jarrett Earnest

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