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Current Print Issue. 17

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FEATURES
MAKOTO AIDA, KORAKRIT ARUNANONDCHAI, TAKASHI MURAKAMI, SHUNYA HAGIWARA, AI WEIWEI, DANH VO, HOU HANRU, GAO SHIMING, ERIC NAKAMURA, TIM BLUM, PHONG BUI, JAPANESE MAIL ART, 1956-2014 // Plus coverage from Istanbul, Hong Kong, Vietnam, Indonesia....and much more.

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TOWARD A FOLK VIDEO GAME (PART 1) by NICHOLAS O’BRIEN / MAKING IT ONLINE by BEN VALENTINE / PROTECTING AND PROMOTING THE OPEN INTERNET by INGRID BURRINGTON / ON POINT 2.03 by MARK VAN PROYEN / ACHIEVEMENT, FAILURE, ASPIRATION: THREE ATTEMPTS TO UNDERSTAND CONTEMPORARY ART (PART 1) by JOHN RAPKO

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WHO'S AFRAID OF THE NEW ABSTRACTION JARRETT EARNEST with ALEX BACON

SFAQ Pick: “Fashionfashion, 2002-2006,” solo exhibition by K8 Hardy at Higher Pictures, New York.

K8 Hardy

“Fashionfashion, 2002-2006″

Higher Pictures

980 Madison Avenue, New York, NY 10075

Reception: September 17, 6-8pm

September 17 – October 11, 2014

 

Screen Shot 2014-09-16 at 2.10.09 PM

For a new exhibition at Higher Pictures, K8 Hardy has produced “Fashionfashion, 2002-2006,” a presentation of oversized zines. In creating these zines, titled Fashionfashion individually and as a series, Hardy explored visual tropes of fashion/lifestyle magazine images, recreating these kinds of highly constructed and photogenic spaces with herself as fashion model and with more casual, grittier scenes as backdrop. Hardy, having previously worked as a stylist’s assistant, is well equipped to manipulate these invented spaces, disturbing common markers of glamour, luxury, and beauty with various forms of exaggeration and ironic juxtaposition.

 

The gallery hosts an opening reception Wednesday, September 17, from 6 – 8 pm.

 

Excerpt from Fashionfashion zines, 2002-2006. Courtesy of Higher Pictures.

Selection from Fashionfashion zines, 2002-2006. Courtesy of Higher Pictures.

 

These zines are a precursor to Hardy’s later works, like her “Untitled Runway Show” presented at the 2012 Whitney Biennial, where the artist’s deconstructive stylistic interventions occupied a similar aesthetic and spatial arrangement to a conventional runway presentation.

 

 

The exhibition remains on view through October 11.

For more information please visit the gallery’s website.

 

Recent SFAQ Picks:

-SFAQ Pick: “tl;dr,” solo exhibition by Cory Arcangel at team (bungalow), Los Angeles.

-SFAQ Pick: “Satan Ceramics,” group exhibition at Salon 94 Freemans, New York.

-SFAQ Picks: First of Fall – San Francisco (Part 2 of 2).

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SFAQ Pick: “tl;dr,” solo exhibition by Cory Arcangel at team (bungalow), Los Angeles.

Cory Arcangel

“tl;dr”

team (bungalow)

306 Windward Avenue, Venice, CA 90291

Reception: September 14, 4 pm

September 14 – November 9, 2014

 

Sunday, September 14, Team Gallery launches team (bungalow), a new project space in Los Angeles, with “tl;dr,” a solo exhibition of work by New York-based artist Cory Arcangel. Currently on view at the gallery’s New York (47 Wooster Street) location, another exhibition by Arcangel with the same name hosts “Lakes,” a series of flat-screen televisions displaying images drawn from pop culture. To these images, Arcangel has applied the Java applet “Lake,” a visual effect that once ran rampant on personal websites, causing glimmering distortions to images. Today, to those familiar with their history, these kinds of effects are as easily dated as some clothing or music.  This awareness of certain technological devices and aesthetics as relics leads us to contemplation of the TV screens themselves, now reasonable hosts for Arcangel’s work but ultimately devices destined for a similar retirement. This relationship between present and past technologies helps one get to what is perhaps the heart of the matter; for the most part, our cultural understanding of artworks employing technological conduits and containers is tenuous and unresolved as yet.

 

Installation view, “tl:dr,” 2014, Team Gallery, New York. Courtesy of Team Gallery.

Installation view, “tl;dr,” 2014, Team Gallery, New York. Courtesy of Team Gallery.

For the exhibition opening Sunday at team (bungalow), Arcangel presents some of his early video game works on inexpensive tablets, cell phones, and PDAs. These works, video games Arcangel has hacked to harness particular visual elements, will be accessible to visitors for interaction. Also on view are a number of Arcangel’s zines, titled “The Source,” which detail and document his creative projects, as well as a retail-style presentation of Arcangel’s new line of merchandise, “Arcangel Surfware.”

 

The project space hosts an opening reception September 14, beginning at 4 pm.

 

Installation view, “tl:dr,” 2014, team (bungalow), Los Angeles. Courtesy of Team Gallery.

Installation view, “tl;dr,” 2014, team (bungalow), Los Angeles. Courtesy of Team Gallery.

 

The exhibition at team (bungalow) remains on view through November 9.

The exhibition at the gallery’s New York location remains on view through October 26.

For more information, please visit the gallery’s website.

 

Recent SFAQ Picks:

-SFAQ Pick: “Satan Ceramics,” group exhibition at Salon 94 Freemans, New York.

-SFAQ Picks: First of Fall – San Francisco (Part 2 of 2).

-SFAQ Picks: First of Fall – San Francisco (Part 1 of 2).

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SFAQ Pick: “Satan Ceramics,” group exhibition at Salon 94 Freemans, New York.

Mary Frey, Pat McCarthy, JJ PEET and Tom Sachs
“Satan Ceramics”
Salon 94 Freemans
1 Freeman Alley, New York, NY 10002
September 7 – October 25, 2014

 

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Now on view at Salon 94 Freemans, a group exhibition titled “Satan Ceramics” features new ceramic work from New York-based artists Mary Frey, Pat McCarthy, JJ PEET and Tom Sachs. The artists meet weekly at the 92nd Street Y and create ceramic sculpture together under the instruction of appointed group leader JJ PEET. Even without an overt statement that the group shares any particular set of philosophies, motivations, or intentions, their communal practice and their experimentation with fundamental forms (vessels, tools, tablets, etc.) is enough to inspire curiosity and speculation.

 

Installation View, "Satan Ceramics," 2014, Salon 94 Freemans, New York. Courtesy of Salon 94.

Installation View, “Satan Ceramics,” 2014, Salon 94 Freemans, New York. Courtesy of Salon 94.

Many works in the show are united by attempts to push contemporary practices and priorities into physical structures typically associated with traditional, even ritual uses. Tom Sachs’ tea bowls bear the marks of creation by hand, while their carefully painted letters form NASA’s original logo. Contemporary imagery spills onto Mary Frey’s otherwise timeless forms; characters from The Simpsons ornament a rectangular form that presents itself as something between ceremonial treasure and TV tray. Pat McCarthy’s pigeon-keeping accoutrements (perches and nesting bowls) take their inspiration from a centuries-old practice, and their aesthetic from a contemporary understanding of system and arrangement. Located at various points along a spectrum of irony and sincerity, the sculptural works of “Satan Ceramics” employ time-tested forms and aesthetic codes to represent the particularities of the present.

 

Tom Sachs, "Cyclops," Porcelain, stereo components, bamboo, and Sharpie markers, 2014, 16.5 × 26 × 8 inches.  Courtesy of Salon 94.

Tom Sachs, “Cyclops,” Porcelain, stereo components, bamboo, and Sharpie markers, 2014, 16.5 × 26 × 8 inches.
Courtesy of Salon 94.

 

Mary Frey, "Catcher," stoneware/underglaze/carbon fiber, 2014, 5 × 5 × 4.5 inches. Courtesy of Salon 94.

Mary Frey, “Catcher,” stoneware/underglaze/carbon fiber, 2014, 5 × 5 × 4.5 inches. Courtesy of Salon 94.

 

Pat McCarthy, "Issue 59, Pages 26-27," Tonal reduction fired on porcelain, 2014, 8.5 × 11 × 0.5 inches.v Courtesy of Salon 94.

Pat McCarthy, “Issue 59, Pages 26-27,” Tonal reduction fired on porcelain, 2014, 8.5 × 11 × 0.5 inches. Courtesy of Salon 94.

 

Installation view (work by Pat McCarthy), “Satan Ceramics,” 2014, Salon 94 Freemans, New York. Courtesy of Salon 94.

Installation view (work by Pat McCarthy), “Satan Ceramics,” 2014, Salon 94 Freemans, New York. Courtesy of Salon 94.

 

 

The exhibition remains on view through October 25.

For more information, please visit the gallery’s website.

 

Recent SFAQ Picks:

-SFAQ Picks: First of Fall – San Francisco (Part 2 of 2).

-SFAQ Picks: First of Fall – San Francisco (Part 1 of 2).

-SFAQ Pick: “Visualizing Consciousness – Hybrids, Fractals, and Ritual,” Saya Woolfalk in Conversation with Jeff Durham at UC Berkeley.

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SFAQ Picks: First of Fall – San Francisco (Part 2 of 2).

The next few days are full of openings at San Francisco galleries.

Here is the second part of our list of selections; find the first part here.

 

 

Hugh Scott-Douglas, "Untitled," UV curable ink on wood panel, 80 x 53 inches, 2014. Courtesy of Jessica Silverman Gallery.

Hugh Scott-Douglas, “Untitled,” UV curable ink on wood panel, 80 x 53 inches, 2014. Courtesy of Jessica Silverman Gallery.

Jessica Silverman Gallery

Hugh Scott-Douglas

“Promises to Pay in Solid Substance”

488 Ellis Street, San Francisco, CA 94102

Reception: September 5, 6-8 pm

September 5 – November 1, 2014

 

Jessica Silverman begins the fall season with “Promises to Pay in Solid Substance,” an exhibition by New York-based artist Hugh Scott-Douglas. Scott-Douglas presents three new bodies of work, as well as “Screentones,” a series first shown in Takashi Murakami’s Tokyo exhibition space. The “Screentones” are scanned images of an adhesive Letraset paper applied to collect dust and debris from a surface, enlarged and printed on wood panels with UV-curable ink. The resultant objects present themselves like paintings, but with the particular and undeniable effects of photography. Scott-Douglas’ new bodies of work share this curious exploration of the physicality of imagery; decommissioned billboards rest as abstract masses around the space in the artist’s “Heavy Images” series, and the series “Amazon.com” and “Economist” present visualizations of various contemporary distribution networks.

 

 

 

Guy Overfelt (left) and Ever Gold Gallery owner Andrew McClintock during the installation of "Free Bird: The Never Ending Joy Ride, 1998-2014."

Guy Overfelt (left) and Ever Gold Gallery owner Andrew McClintock during the installation of “Free Bird: The Never Ending Joy Ride, 1998-2014.” Courtesy of Paul Chinn and the San Francisco Chronicle.

Ever Gold Gallery

Guy Overfelt

“Free Bird: The Never Ending Joy Ride, 1998-2014”

441 O’Farrell, San Francisco, CA, 94102

Reception: September 5, 7-10 pm

September 5 – October 4, 2014

 

Ever Gold Gallery opens a presentation of Guy Overfelt’s ongoing conceptual project “Free Bird: The Never Ending Joy Ride, 1998-2014.” In the gallery, Overfelt has installed his 1977 Pontiac Trans Am, to rest on a white four post car lift. The car, a central part of Overfelt’s conceptual exploration of American culture, is presented here in a partially unfinished state; the Trans Am is almost entirely custom, recreated piece by piece in high-performance materials over time by the artist. The gallery space is just large enough to accommodate the car and its lift, intensifying spatial relationships between the car, its containing space, and viewers. Truly a spectacle, this installation of Overfelt’s project is not to be missed.

 

 

 

Rob Putnam, "Foundlings," ink on paper, 9 7/8 x 7 1/4 inches (each), 2014. Image credit: John Janca. Courtesy of Rena Bransten Gallery.

Robb Putnam, “Foundlings,” ink on paper, 9 7/8 x 7 1/4 inches (each), 2014. Image credit: John Janca. Courtesy of Rena Bransten Gallery.

Rena Bransten Gallery

Robb Putnam

“Foundlings”

1639 Market Street, San Francisco, CA

September 6 – October 25, 2014

Reception: September 6, 1-5 pm

 

At Rena Bransten Gallery, Robb Putnam fills the project space with playful sculptural forms, constructed from found and collected materials. In a series titled “Pelts,” Putnam assembles leather, plastic bags, scrap textiles, and other detritus into abstract forms with some of the characteristics of animals or childhood dolls. These works are complimented by some equally bizarre ink and watercolor drawings; clearly from the same alternate reality as Putnam’s sculptural constructions, these depictions share a complex and childlike balance of humor and fear.

 

 

 

Taha Belal, "untitled (pictures backwards)", detail, newspaper ink transfer on inkjet photo paper, 11.5 x 8.5 inches, 2014. Courtesy of Haines Gallery.

Taha Belal, “untitled (pictures backwards)”, detail, newspaper ink transfer on inkjet photo paper, 11.5 x 8.5 inches, 2014. Courtesy of Haines Gallery.

Haines Gallery

Taha Belal, Kota Ezawa, Jeanne Friscia, Alfredo Jaar, Todd Lavine, and Dinh Q. Le

“Political Fictions”

49 Geary Street, Suite 540, San Francisco, CA 94102

September 4, 2014 – November 1, 2014
Reception: September 4, 5:30-7:30 pm

 

“Political Fictions,” the new exhibition at Haines Gallery, brings together an impressive roster of artists whose practices address reportage and the presentation of current events. Engaging with different channels of distribution and associated content, these artists expose and manipulate trends, tropes, and more in this familiar yet treacherous terrain of media culture. Works on view include Kota Ezawa’s iconic animated video “The Simpson Verdict,” newspaper images treated to a very manual reproduction process by Taha Belal, a mesmerizing and monumental image-turned-sculpture by Dinh Q. Le, and more.

 

 

 

More new exhibitions:

Jason Roberts Dobrin at Adobe Books Backroom Gallery

Reception: September 5, 7-10 pm

Ruth Pastine at Brian Gross Fine Art

Reception: September 13, 4-6 pm

Chris Doyle at Catharine Clark Gallery

Reception: September 13, 4-6 pm

Markus Schinwald at CCA Wattis Institute

Reception: September 9, 7-9 pm

Jered Sprecher at Gallery 16

Reception: September 5, 6-9 pm

Nigel Poor at Haines Gallery 

Reception: September 4, 5:30-7:30 pm

David Johnson at Harvey Milk Photo Center

Reception: September 6, 1-4 pm

Joel Daniel Phillips at Hashimoto Contemporary

Reception: September 6, 6-10 pm

Rob and Nick Carter at Jenkins Johnson Gallery

Reception: September 4, 5:30-7:30 pm

David Park, Richard Diebenkorn, Nathan Oliveira, and Manuel Neri at John Berggruen Gallery

Reception: September 4, 5:30-7:30 pm

Judith Marshall and Bryan Boutwell at McLoughlin Gallery
Reception: September 4, 6-8 pm

Kirk Crippens at Rayko Photo Center

Reception: September 10, 6-8 pm

Josh Begley, Douglas Coupland, Doug Rickard, Joachim Schmid, Penelope Umbrico, and Michael Wolf at Robert Koch Gallery

Reception: September 11, 5:30-7:30 pm

 

 

Recent SFAQ Picks:

-SFAQ Picks: First of Fall – San Francisco (Part 1 of 2).

-SFAQ Pick: “Visualizing Consciousness – Hybrids, Fractals, and Ritual,” Saya Woolfalk in Conversation with Jeff Durham at UC Berkeley.

-SFAQ Pick: “No Person is Without a Shadow,” group exhibition at Interface Gallery, Oakland.

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SFAQ Picks: First of Fall – San Francisco (Part 1 of 2).

This week, the galleries of San Francisco open new exhibitions for the beginning of the fall season.

Here are some of our selections for the upcoming days.

 

 

IranPrisonersBook_0

Southern Exposure

Morehshin Allahyari, Ali Dadgar, Ala Ebtekar, Amir H. Fallah, Arash Fayez, Hushidar Mortezaie, Gelare Khoshgozaran, Sanaz Mazinani, Amitis Motevalli, Haleh Niazmand, Azin Seraj, Taravat Talepasand

“Theory of Survival: Fabrications”

3030 20th Street, San Francisco, CA 94110

Reception: September 5, 7-9 pm

September 5 – October 25, 2014

 

A project by Taraneh Hemami, “Theory of Survival: Fabrications” features twelve California-based Iranian artists. Hemami’s ongoing project “Theory of Survival” creates spaces for conversations, investigations, and actions to expand engagement with Iranian political and cultural history. The exhibition at Southern Exposure takes the form of a pop-up bazaar: a labyrinthine array of booths with goods for sale, a tea house for discussions and performances, and a library featuring a growing collaborative collection of writings and resources. Each Saturday, artists are present at the bazaar to lead workshops, speak about their projects, and handle sales at their respective booths; two night markets include games, performances, and music. For more information on these events and Hemami’s “Theory of Survival,” please visit the website of Southern Exposure.

 

 

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Romer Young Gallery

Pablo Guardiola

“Maintenance Yard”

1240 22nd Street, San Francisco, CA 94107

Reception: September 5, 6-9 pm

September 5 – October 11, 2014

 

Romer Young begins the season with “Maintenance Yard,” an exhibition by Pablo Guardiola. The gallery’s artist-in-residence for the past month, Guardiola is co-director of Beta Local, a non-profit organization in Puerto Rico dedicated to a multi-faceted promotion of artistic and aesthetic exploration. Beta Local offers practical creative support to individuals through year-long courses, an artist-in-residency program, and La Ivan Illich, an experimental open-school platform. For the exhibition at Romer Young, Guardiola presents photographic and sculptural work, exploring visions of history through public perceptions of Francis Drake and George Dewey, disputed figures that can be written (like most history) to seem heroic and revolutionary, or destructive and backwards. In his presentation of imagery and objects, Guardiola suggests the open-endedness of historical narrative and relationship in a similar manner.

 

 

 

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Park Life Gallery

Serena Mitnik-Miller

“S W I R L”

3049 22nd Street, San Francisco, CA 94110

September 5, 6-9 pm

September 5 – October 5, 2014

 

The first exhibition at Park Life’s new exhibition space in the Mission, “S W I R L” features the paintings of Serena Mitnik-Miller, an artist and designer living and working between San Francisco and Los Angeles. In the paintings, created in watercolor pigment, Mitnik-Miller connects concentric shapes into smoothly linked masses, filling sections with layers of color. Mediative and minimal, charming and illusionary, Mitnik-Miller’s paintings playfully explore formal relationships.

 

 

 

More new exhibitions:

Laurina Paperina at Fouladi Projects

Reception: September 5, 6-8 pm

Clem Crosby at George Lawson Gallery

Reception: September 6, 4-7:30 pm

Barbara Takenaga at Gregory Lind Gallery

Reception: September 6, 4-6 pm

Rob and Nick Carter at Jenkins Johnson Gallery

Reception: September 4, 5:30-7:30 pm

 

 

Recent SFAQ Picks:

-SFAQ Pick: “Visualizing Consciousness – Hybrids, Fractals, and Ritual,” Saya Woolfalk in Conversation with Jeff Durham at UC Berkeley.

-SFAQ Pick: “No Person is Without a Shadow,” group exhibition at Interface Gallery, Oakland.

-SFAQ Pick: “Pat’s Pigeon Club,” solo exhibition by Pat McCarthy at Muddguts, New York.

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SFAQ Pick: “Visualizing Consciousness – Hybrids, Fractals, and Ritual,” Saya Woolfalk in Conversation with Jeff Durham at UC Berkeley.

Saya Woolfalk and Jeff Durham

“Visualizing Consciousness – Hybrids, Fractals, and Ritual”

370 Dwinelle Hall, UC Berkeley Campus

September 2, 5-7 pm

 

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Tuesday, September 2, UC Berkeley hosts “Visualizing Consciousness – Hybrids, Fractals, and Ritual,” a conversation between artist Saya Woolfalk and Jeff Durham, curator of Himalayan art at San Francisco’s Asian Art Museum. This event is presented as part of the Department of Art Practice Wiesenfeld Visiting Artist Lecture Series, in association with the Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion. Born in Japan and working in New York, Woolfalk creates imagery and artifacts for invented worlds, as well as multi-media elucidations on these unfamiliar beings and spaces. The manner of display often references anthropological study, and Woolfalk’s multifaceted practice (including painting, drawing, sculpture, printmaking, installation, video, and performance) accommodates the grand scale of these constructed cultures and landscapes.

 

The lecture at UC Berkeley takes place Tuesday, September 2, from 5 – 7 pm.

 

Currently in residency at Headlands Center for the Arts, Woolfalk has produced “ChimaTEK™: Hybridity Visualization Mandala,” a new multi-media work developed in conjunction with “Enter the Mandala: Cosmic Centers and Mental Maps of Himalayan Buddhism,” a current exhibition at San Francisco’s Asian Art Museum. This new performance, an exploration of Asian-American identity and hybridity, features the Empathics, a group of human forms that metamorphose and shape-shift based on interactions with their environment, as well as an original soundtrack by Paul D. Miller, a.k.a. DJ Spooky that Subliminal Kid.

 

The performance takes place at the Asian Art Museum on Thursday, September 4, from 6 – 9 pm.

 

 

Saya Woolfalk, "Chimera" (from The Empathics series), 2013.

Saya Woolfalk, “Chimera” (from The Empathics series), 2013.

 

For more information on the conversation at UC Berkeley, please visit the website of UC Berkeley.

For more information on the performance at the Asian Art Museum, please visit the website of Headlands Center for the Arts.

 

Recent SFAQ Picks:

-SFAQ Pick: “No Person is Without a Shadow,” group exhibition at Interface Gallery, Oakland.

-SFAQ Pick: “Pat’s Pigeon Club,” solo exhibition by Pat McCarthy at Muddguts, New York.

-SFAQ Pick: “The Perimeter of the World: Contemporary Travel Photography,” a juried exhibition at Rayko Photo Center, San Francisco.

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SFAQ Pick: “No Person is Without a Shadow,” group exhibition at Interface Gallery, Oakland.

Manuel Angeja and Laurie Reid

“No Person is Without a Shadow”

Interface Gallery

486 49th Street, Oakland, CA 94609

Reception: September 5, 6-9 pm

August 13 – September 27, 2014

 

Now on view at Interface Gallery, “No Person is Without a Shadow” features Manuel Angeja and Laurie Reid in a visual dialog about artistic influence and inspiration. The works intentionally reference each other and their surroundings. Angeja presents paintings and an installation; Reid contributes a number of watercolors and glazed ceramic works. Paintings on graph paper by Angeja are contained in binders where viewers can browse through, ultimately leaving the binders ajar and likely to different pages, reconfiguring visual relationships within the gallery and expanding the circle of influence to include gallery visitors. Reid’s ceramic works are so integrated with the gallery space that sometimes they are difficult to discern. In “No Person is Without a Shadow,” the boundaries between artists, objects, and spaces become blurry if not untenable.

 

The gallery hosts a reception during Oakland’s First Friday, September 5, from 6 – 9 pm.

 

 

Manuel Angeja, ""

Manuel Angeja – selection from “No Person is Without a Shadow,” Interface Gallery, Oakland, 2014.

 

Laurie Reid - selection from "No Person is Without a Shadow" at Interface Gallery, Oakland, 2014.

Laurie Reid – selection from “No Person is Without a Shadow,” Interface Gallery, Oakland, 2014.

 

 

The exhibition remains on view through September 27.

For more information, please visit the gallery’s website.

 

Recent SFAQ Picks:

-SFAQ Pick: “Pat’s Pigeon Club,” solo exhibition by Pat McCarthy at Muddguts, New York.

-SFAQ Pick: “The Perimeter of the World: Contemporary Travel Photography,” a juried exhibition at Rayko Photo Center, San Francisco.

-SFAQ Pick: “ONES AND ZEROS,” group exhibition at di Rosa, Napa.

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Art Linkage

A selection of articles from around the interwebs hand picked by the editors of SFAQ

 

 

Art Everywhere is waiting to be stepped on

Art Everywhere is waiting to be stepped on

 

 

BYTE SIZE:

 

 

Peter Schjeldahl on the perils of mass art spectacles, Art Everywhere

August 7th The New Yorker

 

The boring effects of middle class taste on the arts

August 9th, The Guardian

 

The Gentrification of Marfa by it’s Art Folk

August 11, Hyperallergic

 

The decline of private sales at Sothebys

August 12th Artnet News

 

The insulting Picasso that was foisted on Robert Williams

August 12th Artnet News

 

A look at Bogota’s democratic graffiti scene

August 12th The Economist

 

The problem of Marina Abramović and her mediocre mindfulness

August 13th Hyperallergic

 

Leon Black, owner of Publishing house Phaidon, buys Artspace.com online art market

August 14th Bloomberg

 

Moma to digitize the entirety of Warhol’s film collection

August 15th Artnet news

 

 

 

 

ATTENTION DEFICIT DEFIERS:

 

 

Cory Arcangel on Warhol and his early precursors to todays digital art and the archiving process needed to rescue the artists files from his archaic Amiga computer

ArtForum

 

The enlightenment that Bertolt Brecht brought to the arts, and the delightful torture his body lived through

The Times Literary Supplement

 

The secret life of Samuel Beckett, spy

Independent

 

A reminder of the important work of art historian and critic Meyer Schapiro

Artspace

 

Jed Perl believes liberals are the cause for the demise of good art, or at least that’s what his publisher wants you to believe with their audacious headline “Liberals are killing art”

New Republic

 

 

-SFAQ STAFF, Week of August 17TH 2014.

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“What is Art”—On My Birthday

One year ago on my birthday I tried to define “art” for Carter Ratcliff’s guest editorship of The Brooklyn Rail “What is Art—Why Even Ask?” On this birthday morning I’ll add a few more points:

 

* * *

 

I’m in my blue period, which means all my clothes are blue and I think about “blueness”. Which is not to say I’m sad—there is an entire emotional spectrum within “blues”.

 

* * *

 

Color is contingent on time, space, and feeling. I have a mental catalog of colors encountered on particular surfaces, in certain places, at exact times of day, during different emotional situations—the real specifics of color are almost infinite.

 

* * *

 

I’ve been thinking about feelings, as in this passage from “Tess of the D’Urbervilles”:

 

“But the complexion even of external things seemed to suffer transmutation as her announcement progressed. The fire in the grate looked impish— demoniacally funny, as if it did not care in the least about her strait. The fender grinned idly, as if it too did not care. The light from the water-bottle was merely engaged in a chromatic problem. All material objects around announced their irresponsibility with terrible iteration. And yet nothing had changed since the moments when he had been kissing her; or rather, nothing in the substance of things. But the essence of things had changed.”

 

Art seems more about these essences than substances; or rather, I am interested in how the essence of material things changes in our perceptions because of our feelings.

 

* * *

 

Watching Nina Simone sing “Feelings” live in Montreux 1976, over and over again: the empty lyrics that become flooded by the intensity of her performance, which is incandescent, oppositional; she antagonizes the audience as a way of wanting them closer—a desire to be feeling together.

 

* * *

 

The most important and embattled quality now is imagination. So much current art fails to imagine any new way of being in the world; instead it settles for exploiting the way things are.

 

* * *

 

Writing about art, like making it, means being concerned with every aspect of that human life; no feeling is beneath its dignity and no experience irrelevant.

 

* * *

 

Jarrett Earnest
New York
13 August 2014

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SFAQ Pick: “Pat’s Pigeon Club,” solo exhibition by Pat McCarthy at Muddguts, New York.

“Pat’s Pigeon Club”

Pat McCarthy

Muddguts

41 Montrose Ave., Brooklyn, NY 11206

August 11 – August 22, 2014

 

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Monday, August 11, Muddguts opens “Pat’s Pigeon Club,” a new exhibition by Pat McCarthy. The exhibition takes the form of a supply depot for pigeon enthusiasts, stocked with coop supplies, feed, training tools, as well as handmade porcelain nesting bowls and whistles. Pigeon keeping is practically as old as time; between symbolic meanings and ceremonial uses for the bird, the employment of pigeons as carriers of messages, and their use in biological and behavioral studies, the pigeon has served myriad functions. McCarthy celebrates the legacy and practice of pigeon keeping, very much alive today in Brooklyn, with an exhibition serving as both supply shop and meeting place.

 

Pat’s Pigeon Club is open daily from noon into the evening.

Various events, conferences, and radio broadcasts will take place during the course of the exhibition.
 

Courtesy of the artist.

Flyer for “Pat’s Pigeon Club,” on view at Muddguts, New York. Courtesy of the artist.


 


 

The exhibition remains on view through August 22.

For more information, please visit the gallery’s website.

 

Recent SFAQ Picks:

-SFAQ Pick: “The Perimeter of the World: Contemporary Travel Photography,” a juried exhibition at Rayko Photo Center, San Francisco.

-SFAQ Pick: “ONES AND ZEROS,” group exhibition at di Rosa, Napa.

-SFAQ Pick: “Hood Pass,” solo exhibition by Stephen McClintock at Louis B. James, New York.

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